Leader of Family Wealth Planning, Executive Director, Client Advisory, Shareholder

Taylor Gitcho

As Leader of Family Wealth Planning, Executive Director of Client Advisory, and Shareholder of Crestone Capital, Taylor leads the strategic management of Family Wealth Planning, while serving as a trusted advisor to high-net-worth entrepreneurs and executives and their families. 

In addition to providing clients with personalized and integrated wealth management solutions, Taylor works on complex wealth planning issues that arise for high-net-worth individuals and their families, including overall trust, estate, philanthropic and income tax planning.

Taylor received a Master of Business Administration degree from the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in Economics and Spanish from the University of Colorado. At the University of Colorado, Taylor participated in a year-long international studies program in Sevilla, Spain through the Center for International Education Exchange.

Taylor is actively involved in building long-term, life-changing relationships with at-risk urban youth as a Board of Director for Colorado Uplift. She also leads Crestone’s philanthropic initiatives and engagement efforts with the University of Colorado Boulder Leeds School of Business, supporting diversity and inclusion and guiding the next generation of leaders. 
 

What do you enjoy most about wealth management?
The variety. We do so many things for our clients and no client family is the same. While I've built a solid foundation, the learning is constant!
What is the biggest challenge of working in wealth management?
The emotional nature of the investment markets and of investors. We're all programmed to make poor investment decisions (buy high and sell low) and helping our clients maintain this discipline can be challenging.
What is your favorite book or what’s the most influential book you’ve read?
My favorite book of late has been Boys in the Boat, but a more influential book I read during grad school was Great by Choice (by Jim Collins).